A great webcam can assist you look your best by offering extras that the majority built-in webcams lack, like autofocus, light correction, full HD video, and therefore the ability to border yourself good. After researching 13 top webcams and testing five, we recommend the Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam. it’s all the features you would like for nice video, whether you’re using it for video conferencing, streaming, or checking in with distant friends and family.

Our pick
Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam
Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam
Best webcam for many people
With the C920S, you’ll get full HD video with the foremost natural-looking colors and clear details—at a price less than similar cameras that are designed more for conference rooms. Plus, the C920S features a physical lens cap, so you’re never on camera once you don’t want to be.

*At the time of publishing, the worth was $50.

The Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam is succeeding our top webcam pick, the C920, which has held that spot for the past three years. Like its predecessor, the C920S captures sharp, high-definition (1080p) video with excellent auto white balance and speedy autofocus. It’s easy to line up and use, plus the new webcam cover protects your privacy and can cause you to feel easier having it always attached to your computer or monitor.

Budget pick
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Best cheap HD webcam
This is Logitech’s least-expensive 1080p webcam. It’s also the simplest cheap option we’ve found which will capture better video quality than the built-in cameras on many computers.


If you would like a less-expensive option, we recommend the Logitech HD Webcam C615. Its video quality doesn’t match the C920S’s—the picture isn’t as sharp, autofocus is slower, and auto white balance isn’t as accurate—but the C615 is simply as easy to line up, provides 1080p resolution, and has the simplest quality of any webcam we tested under $50. Its mount also folds round the camera to guard the lens, making the C615 a solid portable option.

Also great
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Best webcam for video-game streaming
With its unique light ring and 720p resolution at a faster-than-common 60 fps, the Kiyo can provide a flattering image as you stream video games.

If you often use your webcam to stream to sites like YouTube or Twitch and need to be ready to put smooth 60 fps video of yourself on top of your 60 fps game footage, the Razer’s Kiyo Streaming Webcam is for you. The adjustable ring light can assist you get clear video in low light situations—our panel of testers noticed that video samples from this camera were more flattering for faces than the opposite cameras we tested. But the brightness of the sunshine, even at its lowest setting, are often jarring the primary few times you employ the webcam and would be more distracting than helpful if you’re mostly in professional video conferences.

*At the time of publishing, the worth was $50.

Budget pick
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Best cheap HD webcam
$32 from Amazon
$60 from Walmart
Also great
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Best webcam for video-game streaming
$80 $60 from Amazon
You save $20 (25%)

Who this is often for
Most recent laptops and all-in-one desktops have a decent—sometimes even great—built-in camera, numerous people don’t need a standalone webcam. But a USB webcam can provide better quality and extra features like autofocus for video calls, recording videos, and streaming games to assist you look more professional.

How to achieve knowledgeable Video Call From Home
How to achieve knowledgeable Video Call From Home
Whether you’re employed from home otherwise you got to nail employment interview via Skype, these are Wirecutter’s tips for looking and sounding sort of a pro on video calls.

If you employ a second monitor or if your laptop’s integrated webcam is during a dumb place, a standalone webcam will assist you frame yourself properly so you’re looking into the camera, as against presenting a wierd up-your-nose angle from your laptop. That’s much friendlier for video conferences and calls. And if you’re streaming, it’s crucial to be ready to frame your shot correctly with an external camera.

How we picked
A selection of 5 webcams tested for this review, all attached to the highest fringe of a monitor.

We evaluated 13 current webcams for the update to the present guide, including our previous picks, new webcams released since the last time we tested, and best-selling cameras from Amazon. To narrow the sector right down to five contenders, we compared each camera’s specs, test data from the previous version of our guide, and reviews from webcam owners and professional reviewers.

A good webcam for many people should meet all of those basic criteria, which we used as guidelines for our research:

Price: A webcam with great video quality doesn’t need to cost much. Even professional streamers or YouTubers with more demanding requirements don’t got to spend over $100. Webcams over $100 often offer a bigger field of view—90 degrees versus 70 to 80 degrees—which is useful if you would like to point out more of the space, like a council table with many participants. another webcams that cost more are “designed for business,” meaning mostly that they’re certified to figure with Skype and other video software. But that certification makes no sense for many top webcams today to figure with those programs.
Resolution and frame rate: We favored cameras that support a minimum of full high-definition video (1920×1080, or 1080p resolution) at 30 fps, which is beneficial for the streaming apps that support it and for video recorded locally. Some high-end cameras support 720p video at 60 frames per second, which makes for smoother video but isn’t necessary for many people that just want to seem better in video calls.
Autofocus: We considered only those models that support autofocus. This feature allows webcams to regulate their focus once you move closer to or farther faraway from the camera or once you hold something up ahead of it, so you usually rush.
Automatic brightness and color correction: you ought to be ready to manually adjust these settings if you actually want to, but any good webcam should offer you an honest image without requiring you to twiddle settings.
A good clip or stand: Any webcam needs a clip that creates it simple to connect it to a spread of laptop screens and desktop monitors, and it should be easy to tilt the mic up or right down to adjust the view. Stands that also allow the cameras to take a seat independently on a table or desk, that allow the camera to swivel, or that include a tripod mount are a bonus.
A few other things are nice to possess, but most of the people don’t got to worry about these:

A decent microphone: Most webcams include a noise-cancelling microphone in order that you’ll be easily heard when you’re chatting during a room with a touch ambient noise (like a ceiling fan). But if you would like better sound quality, you ought to consider either a USB microphone, or our picks for office, gaming, or Bluetooth headsets with integrated mics.
A glass lens: Glass lenses generally bring better picture quality than plastic ones. Most mid-level to high-end webcams have a glass lens, but ultimately the camera’s resolution, autofocus, and brightness/color adjustments have a bigger impact on image quality.
A larger field of view: a bigger field of view (measured diagonally) means the people you’re chatting with can see more of you and your room directly. except for video chatting, a bigger view isn’t that important, and most webcams offer roughly an equivalent field of view anyway. most of the cameras we tested had a field of view between about 70 and 80 degrees; the lowest-end model had a 60-degree field of view, and therefore the highest-end model had a 90-degree field of view.
A longer warranty: Most of the webcams we tested had two- or three-year warranties. But overall, webcams are relatively simple, mostly stationary devices that don’t tend to interrupt often.
Extra software: Most webcams will work with none extra software. If the webcam does include optional software, it should be purely additive and straightforward to use.
How we tested
Once we narrowed down the sector, we took multiple pictures and videos with each webcam under controlled conditions so we could compare them directly. for every contender, we captured the following:

A video shot during a room that was well-lit with both sunlight and overhead lighting: These are typical conditions for many webcams, in order that they provides a good idea of how you’ll look once you record video or chat over Skype. the combination of various light sources also can trip up a camera’s white balance.
A still photo during a dimly lit room: Most webcams struggle in low light, but that doesn’t keep people from using them without good lighting.
A video shot at 60 fps: We did this for the Logitech C922x and therefore the Razer Kiyo, the sole two cameras we tested that support this feature.
We then had four Wirecutter staffers—three of them members of our audio and video team—compare the pictures and videos from the various cameras, without knowing which was which, and rank their quality from best to worst. We used that data, our findings from the previous version of this guide, and notes from other professional reviewers to choose our picks.

We also downloaded and used Logitech’s webcam software for the cameras we tested; the opposite webcams don’t offer similar software. All of those webcams are automatically detected by Windows 10, macOS, and other modern operating systems, but fine-tuning certain settings just like the field of view is formed easier with the assistance of this software.

Our pick: Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920S
The Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920S, our top pick webcam.

Our pick
Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam
Logitech C920S HD Pro Webcam
Best webcam for many people
With the C920S, you’ll get full HD video with the foremost natural-looking colors and clear details—at a price less than similar cameras that are designed more for conference rooms. Plus, the C920S features a physical lens cap, so you’re never on camera once you don’t want to be.

*At the time of publishing, the worth was $50.

The Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920S is that the best choice for many people that need a standalone webcam, because of its superb image quality, simple setup, and helpful (but optional) software. Its video—1080p at 30 frames per second—was crisp and clear in our testing, and therefore the autofocus and auto white balance features worked better than those of any of the opposite webcams we tested. Logitech introduced the first C920 back in 2012 and updated it in 2019 to feature the handy privacy shutter. There’s still nothing better for the worth.

When comparing videos and pictures taken by the five webcams we examined, two of our testers—including Wirecutter’s head of photo and video, Michael Hession—ranked the C920S first. Testers found the camera produced “decent neutral colors” and “the truest, most white-balanced and detailed images.” The C920S produces sharp, 1080p-resolution video both locally and streamed through services like Skype, Google Hangouts, and Zoom (though many services default to, or reach at, 720p to save lots of bandwidth).

The C920S’s autofocus works quickly, and therefore the camera does an honest job of adjusting its exposure and white balance—even in rooms with a mixture of sunlight and warm overhead light or when you’re sitting ahead of a bright window. It did even as well as or better than the costlier Logitech C922x and therefore the Logitech Brio in our previous tests. By comparison, the less costly C615 produced darker, less detailed images with overly saturated colors.

Like the other webcams we tested, the C920S works right out of the box on Windows, macOS, and Chrome OS—just connect its USB-A plug to your computer (directly or via an adapter) and launch your video-recording or video-chat software of choice. If you would like more control, you’ll manually adjust exposure, gain, brightness, contrast, color intensity, white balance, and focus using Logitech’s camera settings software for Windows or macOS. the opposite webcams we tested don’t offer similar software, so you’d got to see if your video capture software can assist you adjust the webcam settings.

Logitech’s software allows you to zoom and pan within its 78-degree field of view—say, to stay your lovely face in frame without showing off the clutter around you. additionally to the software settings, you’ll physically tilt the webcam up or right down to control what’s in frame. The C920S doesn’t, however, allow you to swivel the camera left and right. This isn’t a dealbreaker, because you’ll always slide the webcam around or change the framing within the software, but if you would like that feature, take a glance at our budget pick.

The C920S sits on top of your screen: A fold-out foot braces against the rear of your laptop or monitor, while a plastic tab sits ahead to carry the camera in situ. The C920S’s large front tab provides stability, but if you’re employing a laptop or monitor with a super-slim bezel (like the Dell XPS 13 or HP’s Z27n), the tab blocks alittle sliver of the screen. Alternatively, the bottom of the clip is sturdy enough to take a seat the camera on a desk by itself, otherwise you can use the webcam’s standard tripod mount if that works better in your case.

The Logitech c920S shown on a desk.
The C920S can sit on top of your monitor or independently on your desk. Photo: Michael Murtaugh
We found the C920S’s privacy shutter a welcome addition. With the shutter closed, you never need to worry about joining a gathering together with your video on before you’re ready. And when the camera’s not in use, you’ll rest assured you’re not inadvertently recording video, and you don’t need to resort to taping the lens to guard your privacy.

Long-term test notes
More than a couple of Wirecutter staffers use our previous top pick, the C920, as their primary webcam, which is actually an equivalent because the C920S but without the privacy shutter. We still recommend this webcam based not only on our formal research and testing but also on our extensive experience using it a day. Kimber Streams, a writer for our PC coverage who worked on previous versions of this guide, said, “I’ve likely appropriated thousand video calls on the C920, and it’s great. It’s never acted weird or given me a tough time about anything.” Wirecutter staff writer Melanie Pinola has been using the C920S for nine months, using it primarily for Zoom work-related calls and Skype interviews; she has found it particularly useful for not having to awkwardly outstare into her laptop’s built-in camera. It’s worked completely needless to say, and because of the privacy shutter, you would possibly almost forget it’s there.

Flaws but not dealbreakers
The C920S does struggle during a dimly lit room—the frame rate drops because the camera adjusts its exposure settings to stay you visible, and you’ll see more image noise and fewer detail. However, it still maintained the colour balance, and none of the webcams we tested did particularly well in low light apart from the Razer Kiyo due to its built-in light ring.

It takes a while getting wont to opening and shutting the privacy shutter without removing the entire thing from the webcam if you’re during a particular rush. But that’s still more convenient than having to unplug your webcam when you’re not using it if you’re concerned about spies.

Budget pick best webcam: Logitech HD Webcam C615
The Logitech HD Webcam C615 shown attached to a monitor edge.
Photo: Michael Murtaugh
Budget pick
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Logitech HD Webcam C615
Best cheap HD webcam
This is Logitech’s least-expensive 1080p webcam. It’s also the simplest cheap option we’ve found which will capture better video quality than the built-in cameras on many computers.


If you would like to spend as little as possible on an honest webcam, we recommend the Logitech HD Webcam C615. Its video quality, autofocus, and auto white balance aren’t nearly as good because the C920S’s—most people should spend the additional $20 approximately to urge that better performance—but the C615 is simply as easy to line up and has the simplest video quality of any webcam we tested under $50.

Although its image quality isn’t nearly as good because the C920S, the C615 remains a intensify in video quality and adjustability from your standard laptop’s built-in webcam. In our tests, the C615’s images and video were darker, softer, and fewer detailed than those captured by the C920S. Most of our testers rated the standard third or fourth out of the five webcams we tested, saying the colour balance leaned heavily to warm yellow. this will be manually corrected, however, in Logitech’s simple camera settings software, which allows you to control the colour intensity and white balance.

We do just like the C615’s clip better than the C920S’s. you’ll still perch the C615 on top of your screen, on your desk, or on a separate tripod to be used. But the C615’s front tab is smaller than the C920’s, so it doesn’t block screens with super-thin bezels. The C615 also can swivel from side to side or tilt up and down, while the C920 can only tilt, and you’ll fold up the C615 when not in use, with the stand protecting the lens if you would like to throw it in your laptop bag.

A video clip of the logitech camera opening and shutting.
The C615’s folding stand protects the lens, and it’s a pleasant feature if you regularly travel together with your webcam. Photos: Andrew Cunningham
Also great: Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
The Razer Kiyo streaming webcam, shown attached to a monitor edge.

Also great
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Razer Kiyo Streaming Webcam
Best webcam for video-game streaming
With its unique light ring and 720p resolution at a faster-than-common 60 fps, the Kiyo can provide a flattering image as you stream video games.

The Razer Kiyo may be a webcam and ring light in one, designed to form you look as glamorous as possible through flattering lighting and high-resolution 1080p (30 fps) or 720p (60 fps) video capture. a fanatical ring light could set you back $30 or more, but the Kiyo adds adjustable lighting and is priced about an equivalent because the Logitech C920S. the bulk of our testers rated the video and image quality of the Kiyo tops within the low-light setting, little question because the Kiyo offered additional illumination that the opposite webcams didn’t. Even with the brightness turned off in normal lighting situations, the webcam did an honest job of capturing fine detail like gradations in hair color.

Our panelists were impressed with the brightness within the videos produced by the Kiyo with the ring light set to medium. Two people, however, noted that the Kiyo appeared to add a smoothing or blurring effect. But that’s what ring lights are designed to do: reduce unwanted shadows and soften the looks of the camera’s subjects. It can cause you to appear as if a far better, fuzzier-looking version of yourself, but you’ll sacrifice some true-to-life sharpness.

The biggest drawback to the image quality of the Kiyo is that its auto white balance isn’t nearly as good because the C920S. the pictures and videos from the Kiyo tend to be very saturated and painted our testers during a warm, unnaturally orange glow. it had been also slower to autofocus than the C920S when there was motion within the background. Logitech’s camera intended for streaming, the C922x, is most almost like the Kiyo with its 720p (60 fps) video capture. But our panelists ranked the Kiyo’s video and color quality above that of the C922x, particularly when shooting at 60 fps.

The Kiyo is slightly smaller than your standard round drink coaster but a touch bigger than an oreo, and when it sits on your monitor, you would possibly desire you’ve got the attention of Sauron watching you all day. It’s hard to ignore, especially when the sunshine is on. It’s best fitted to situations where you’ll be looking primarily at your screen—rather than directly at the webcam—such as if you’re streaming a computer game instead of conversing on a video call. The luminosity is straightforward to regulate on the fly, however: Just twist the dial left or right, like adjusting the quantity knob on your stereo.

A video clip of somebody adjusting the Razer Kiyo streaming webcam.
The Razer Kiyo’s built-in ring light are often turned on or off with a twist. Photo: Michael Murtaugh
Although it’s not as compact as our other picks, the Kiyo folds up for travel, sort of a stack of three small cookies. The fold-out clip mount is sturdy for perching the webcam on your monitor, and like most of the opposite webcams we tested, you’ll use this one positioned wherever you would like it on your desk—with the ring light, the Kiyo could be an excellent second webcam if you shoot from multiple angles.